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Cornell University

Cornell at a Glance

What's going on across the university from distributed perspectives.

Faculty Discuss Future of Food

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack met with Cornell faculty members July 29 to learn about solutions in the realm of dairy, nutrition and climate change. Kathryn Boor, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS), organized the event. More than two dozen faculty members, primarily from CALS and the College of Veterinary Medicine, and scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service met with Vilsack to discuss dairy herd health, dairy and food processing, workforce development, and Cornell’s teaching, research and extension missions. Learn more.

Cornell University

Cornell at a Glance

What's going on across the university from distributed perspectives.

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Around the University

Summer Stage
Wed, Jul 30, 10:23 AM
Wed, Jul 30, 10:20 AM
Labor Politics in China
Wed, Jul 30, 10:18 AM
Learning to Argue
Wed, Jul 30, 10:10 AM
Workplace Mentorship
Thu, Jul 10, 10:31 AM
Department Chair Adds Role
Thu, Jul 10, 10:27 AM
Resolving Railway Conflict
Thu, Jun 19, 04:02 PM
Big Red Mockers
Tue, Jun 10, 01:57 PM
Shakespeare Celebrated
Wed, May 14, 11:28 AM
Celebrating Hu Shih
Tue, May 13, 10:51 AM
Celebrating Hu Shih
Thu, Apr 24, 09:55 AM
Fall tree planting
Mon, Oct 21, 12:36 PM
Where the Jobs Are
Wed, Jan 30, 11:59 AM
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An Iraq that is to be divided into three states is no more or less of a ‘natural’ representation of the socio-political realities on the ground than a unified Iraq.

-Mostafa Minawi, assistant professor of history and director of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Initiative.

An Iraq that is to be divided into three states is no more or less of a ‘natural’ representation of the socio-political realities on the ground than a unified Iraq.

-Mostafa Minawi, assistant professor of history and director of the Cornell’s Ottoman and Turkish Studies Initiative.

How do you do something that’s technologically advanced that isn’t immediately technologically dated?

-Dean Dan Huttenlocher, on designing the Cornell Tech campus.

"I asked the general manager of a Hyatt hotel recently, what’s most different now from 35 years ago. And he said, ‘My customers really know how to complain'."

-Marketing Professor Chekitan Dev, School of Hotel Administration.

We need a broad variety of skills to keep our economy robust. … more and more [jobs require] at least some post-secondary education.

-Cornell President David Skorton, on Opening Bell with Maria Bartiromo.

It’s not just the technology; it’s the whole set of knowledge and business maturity and economic maturity together.

-Johnson Dean Soumitra Dutta, on the continuing “digital divide” between countries.

It’s not just the technology; it’s the whole set of knowledge and business maturity and economic maturity together.

-Johnson Dean Soumitra Dutta, on the continuing “digital divide” between countries.

While no one wants whites to be oppressed, we also would do well to pay some mind to all of the ways that black and Latino students face structural impediments to their even making it onto college campuses. Whites simply do not face the same hurdles.

-Noliwe Rooks, associate professor in the Department of Africana Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences, on the U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding Michigan’s ban on using race as a factor in admissions.

[S]pending years in a job you dislike is a recipe for regret and a tragic mistake. There was no issue about which [they] were more adamant and forceful.
 

-Prof. Karl Pillemer, on interviewing nearly 1,500 elderly people.

I have always thought that my most important job . . . was mentoring the next generation of physicians and scientists.

-Dr. Laurie Glimcher, Dean of Weill Cornell Medical College, in a Fast Company interview (Yes, You Do Have Time to Mentor).
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