Suzanne Snedeker reviews the scientific basis for three videos the Cornell Program on Breast Cancer and Environmental Risk Factors (BCERF) produced for young women on estrogenic ingredients found in everyday products. The chemicals released from plastics, cosmetics, detergents and electronics may influence the risk of breast cancer, and new evidence from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) shows wide-spread low level exposure to many of these estrogenic chemicals.

Snedeker is a toxicologist, cancer biologist and public health educator. She received her B.S. from Cornell University and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and served as a staff fellow at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) before joining the Cornell faculty in 1995. She continues her risk assessment research and extension outreach in the Sprecher Institute for Comparative Cancer Research at Cornell.

Snedeker's presentation was given as a part a Cancer and Environment Regional Forum that took place at the Wang Center of Stony Brook University on Long Island, NY on November 3, 2008. This forum, which was open to the public, was sponsored by the Cornell Program on Breast Cancer and Environmental Risk Factors (BCERF).

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